Hobie 16 N. Americans – Navarre, FL

Day 1

We hit the water late because of no wind, so the whole day was sailed in 5-8k.  The 66 boats are split into 4 groups, and two of the groups start in each of 2 starts.  It is a rotation system that does not put 66 boats on a long starting line since Santa Rosa channel is small.  It would make it just too crowded.

The first race of the day was in “strong” breeze (strong for the day) on a course 2.  Winds would oscillate with puffs backing the breeze.  Committee kept a close eye on the thundercloud cells above, but no lightning ever got close.

J & Laura got a great start at the boat, went the right way, and scored the division’s best finish with a 10.  They nipped Jennifer & Kailey at the line.  Peter & Jo had a so-so start, came back from the grave from a horrible first leg to capture an 11.  Will & Josh were late for the start and never fully recovered.  It is a tough fleet, with all of the usual names (and a bunch of really good newbies) showing up to qualify for Worlds.

The 2nd race (also a ‘2’) had breeze on the first lap until it died away for the remaining 2 laps.  None of the NW teams prospered.  Will & Josh were fouled badly by another boat just before the start.  Peter & Jo never got up to the line at the boat and were buried in the 2nd rank.  The starts weren’t much better for J/Laura or Jennifer/Kailey.  The latter got fouled in the 2nd race which didn’t help matters either.

It is a crowded field, with half the fleet going upwind and half the fleet going downwind.  Forecast is for not much more wind…and probably less.  More later.

Day 2

Tuesday came without much change in the weather — still light breeze at about 5k.  But there was no 2-hour postponement like the previous day.  There are occasional puffs that come down the course, and there are definitely some windshifts.

Some sailors on the beach are complaining about the light air.  I mean, Hobies are meant to trapeze and fly a hull.  If you are going to organize a large regatta here at this time of year why not just do it in Sunfishes or Lasers?

The extra 2 hours of racing allowed the committee to get in 3 total races (6 starts) before the wind softened.  In the 1st start of the 2nd race there was a general recall, which was too bad because it was the best start of the regatta for the 2 NW teams in the start — Jennifer/Kailey and Peter/Jo.  The recall put the start under the ‘U’ flag, but no problem — everyone behaved.

Peter/Jo had the best day with a 3-5-5 to move up to 13th.  But the most exciting finish belonged to Will/Josh who led 2 of the 3 laps in the first race of the day.  They were eventually overhauled to capture a 5th.  That race, combined with their other 2 performances moved them well up in the standings to 42nd.

Jennifer/Kailey had a good day as well.  Finishing the day strong with a 13th moved them up into 37th.  With 40 boats advancing to the gold fleet after Wednesday’s racing, the two youth teams will be fighting for every point.

J/Laura struggled in the light stuff.  They have not yet found the pace we are used to from them.  But at 47th they are still in the hunt for the gold fleet.  A strong performance on Wed. Will most assuredly move them, and the other 3 NW teams into the gold fleet.  Keep your fingers crossed.

Day 3

Wednesday was the last day of the round robin.  Three of the NW teams were on the bubble — Jennifer/Kailey at 37th, Josh/Will at 42nd, and J/Laura at 47th.  With only 40 teams advancing to the gold fleet, the pressure was on.

The day started with better-than-average pressure — around 8k.  But a huge wind shift forced PRO Matt Bounds to reset the course.  Bu the time the sea breeze had filled in it was back to its tepid 6k.

The light winds made for some very crowded mark roundings, with as many as 8-10 boats coming into the gate at the same time.  Clear air was the order of the day.  And with a persistent veer, the teams favored the right side.  A few holes developed on the edges, and the middle was chopped up.  So picking the right lane in the right direction was paramount.

Peter/Jo suffered a DSQ in the first race which pushed them to 17th.  The bright spot was Jennifer/Kailey who had some of their own issues to overcome to move up to 36th and make the cut into gold.  Yeahhh!

will/Josh and J/Laura were not so fortunate and got pushed into silver fleet.  The cool thing about silver fleet is all of the previous scores are wiped out, and each boat starts with a clean slate.  This should help both teams.  Will/Josh have shown they can keep pace — they led 2 of the 3 laps in one race Tuesday before falling to 5th at the hands of the big guns.  J/Laura — who have been underperforming all week — have finally got the boat dialed in and showed good boat speed.

If all of the teams can sail clean the next 2 days look for advancement on all fronts.

Day 4

Day 4 is an important day.  It is the last full day of racing because racing usually shuts down on the last day so competitors have a chance to pack up boats.  So Thursday is the opportunity to make a move.

The big winners of the day in Div. 4 were J/Laura.  They had made some rigging adjustments on Wed. that improved performance.  And they delivered the mail on Thursday.

Racing in the silver fleet where the previous scores were wiped clean, J/Laura were able to post a 1-2 in their 27-boat fleet.  They sandwiched those scores around what will hopefully end up being a respectable throwout (12), to currently stand 4th in fleet.

Will/Josh also had a good day.  Currently sitting 10th in silver fleet, they are just 6 points out of 5th with 3 races expected tomorrow.

The two Div. 4 teams in gold fleet did not fare as well.  Peter/Jo rounded the last gate in the first two races of the day in 4th and 7th, only to fall to 17th and 12th respectively in the light airs.   That pushed them back one position to 18th overall.  Jennifer/Kailey overcame a disastrous middle race to hold on to 36th in the gold fleet.

We have figured out that the wind starts in the east.  Then as thundervlouds develop over land to the north of us, convection forces a seabreeze that eventually clocks to the SW.  The timing of that veer is the wild card.  Keeping an eye to the north helps, but is no guarantee.  With the wind clocking as much as 130 degrees over the course of a day, going the right way can pay (or lose) big dividends.  Case in point, Thursday’s racing was the toughest day us far.  Nine of the top 10 teams earned their throwout today.

Laura bragged that she was able to trap out for 30 seconds in the first race.  Jo has trapped out twice all week — both times for about 5-10 sec.  Forecast for the last day is as funky as we have seen it — starting north in the morning, then switching to W-SW in the afternoon.  The wind is supposed to build to 10-14 mph by 3 p.m., the cutoff time for starts.  So we may be packing our boats up in the best breeze of the day!  Sounds a bit like the Pacific NW.

Day 5

The final and penultimate day.  This is the day where positions are generally fixed, but gains are achievable.  With the silver fleet throwing out the scores of the first three days, it stood to reason that larger changes were available there than in the gold fleet.

Friday actually brought the best breeze of the entire week with 10k. There was even some use of one of those two thingies that dangle on each side of the boat. We heard some people call them trap handles. Whatever. In fact Peter purposely left his trapeze on the beach Thursday

Each Div. 4 team has had its day in the sun (no pun intended).  Unfortunately no one team was able to string together more than one day in e light, variable, and very difficul conditions.

For our team the day belonged to Will/Josh who followed a very respectable 8th in the first race (out of 27) with a photo finish 2nd in the second, and last, race of the day to finish 10th overall.  That performance fared  better than J/Laura who, after a stellar 1-2 yesterday were looking to throw their middle race and move up from 4th.  The gods had other ideas, and two lackluster performances pushed them to 7th overall.

in the gold fleet Peter/Jo continued to practice snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.  Two so-so finishes actually advanced them 2 spots to 16th overall. (Trophies went 15 deep.). Jennifer/Kailey ere caught over early in the first race of the day and used that as a throwout.  They recovered nicely in the last race with a 17 to move up two spots to 34th.

Takeaways

Jennifer/Kailey were probably the biggest winners.  Making gold fleet allowed them to mix it up with “the big boys and girls”, and gain some valuable experience. They will be able to take those lessons and use them for many years to come.

The light airs brought a lot of intense pressure on course.  Speed was king.  Boats were close together.  Mark roundings were crowded and tight.  Clear air was critical.

 

Stadium racing in Comox is the bomb!!

OMG!!  If you have never done stadium racing (like me) it will blow your mind.  Stadium racing is short-course racing that revs up the heart rate, puckers the ole sphincter, and is an adrenaline rush the kind of which you have never experienced.

James, Stuart, and Andrew Robinson up in Comox put this together, and it is the bomb!  They let us borrow their Diam 24 trimaran for the weekend.  It comes with a furling jib and Code Zero.  This is the training boat most of the French teams use with names like Banque Populaire and Francois Gabart sprinkling the headlines.

You start with a reaching start, just like in the America’s Cup.  Except the turning mark at Comox is only 2 boat lengths from a rock jetty!  That first time my rudders cavitated for 3-4 seconds, hurtling us straight for “the wall” and ultimate extinction, before they dug in and saved us and the boat from obliteration.

Next leg is downwind.  Keep the kite up.  What?  We are already there?  Crap!  Hurry up and douse!  Unfurl the jib!  We’re going right out of the gate.  Ten seconds later we are tacking within five feet of the jetty.  Fans are shouting to us from the overhanging outlook 10 feet above, and rooting us on in the middle of our tack.  Meanwhile Stuart is giving the play-by-play over the loudspeaker.  Stay focused.

Got a minute to collect our thoughts and clean up the carnage on the upwind leg.  Only a minute.  We’ve closed on Andrew and the cross will be close…inches close.  Which way out of the upwind gate?  We’re going left.  Crap!  We have to thread our way through the pilings from an abandoned pier.  Whew.  Made that.  Into a gybe.   Where’s Andrew?  Crap again!  He went outside and gained another 3 boat lengths.

Come on, gents!  Only one more short lap to go!  Stuart is still blaring the play-by-play.  I can hear the crowd cheering us on.  Let’s go.

After one more lap of total chaos it is back to the reaching mark for the final reach into the finish.  Flying a hull as we get the horn!  Victory again.  Well, almost victory.  Second place.  It will have to do.  Especially since there are only two boats!   Somebody pass me a gallon of water, 5 Valiums, and 3 energy bars.  It’s only been a 15 minute race and I am ready to collapse.

What?  We’re in sequence again already?  We gotta do it again?  Yeahhhh, baby!  Bring it on!!!  I want more!

(More photos to come.)

Jericho & R2AK Update

Jericho can be dicey sometimes.  Some times you can be sitting out there in 60 deg. wind shifts (like last year), and other times you can be hauling ass in a beautiful, 20k westerly (like this year).  Yep.  That’s right.  If you skipped Jericho this year you missed out on a doozy, and if you were there you are still wearin’ the smile smeared all the way across your face !

Saturday saw 5 races in 17-22k with gusts to 25k.  Water was flat owing to a 2-3k flood that caused a bit of havoc at the weather mark for some of the sailors.  The flat water allowed the skippers to put the bow down, grin from ear to ear, and let out an occasional “Whoop!”  Watching the F-18s barrel down the shore under kite was fun, but the real bonus was the incredible scenery.  Sunny and warm both days with the urban, Vancouver skyline to the east giving way to the snow-capped mountains to the north.

Those of you not watching the R2AK tracker, I highly suggest you keep it off if you want to get anything done during the day!  The race is on and updated pretty much regularly so you can sit there watch the tracker and your grass grow all at the same time.

It is pretty exciting with Morgana Buell’s team “Sail Like a Girl” leading the race as of this writing.  But the lead is slim and nothing is given, especially this early in the going.  But it is pretty cool to see this team of 8 women sailing their Melges 32 like it is stolen.  Go girls!!

2018 Calendar is up

Plan your Hobie schedule and book your reservations because the 2018 Hobie sailing calendar is up and live!  Dates always seem to be subject to change, but as best as we can tell none of the dates have changed for, well, over 6 hours!  lol  But seriously, most of these dates you can bank on.

So get with your crew, spouse, significant other, family, and whoever else might be in your calendar and chart out which events you will be attending.  It is best to put the events in your calendar otherwise you might forget them.  Putting them in the calendar increases the chances you will attend.

Looking forward to seeing everyone next year!

And here is a spreadsheet version of the same (hopefully!).  2018 Division 4 Schedule

Div. 4 AGM announced

Hobie Division 4 (that would be the Pacific NW for you newbies) Hobie Catting in Division 4 at Lake Quinault, WAannounced today the date and place for its Annual General Meeting (AGM).  Actually, they announced it Oct. 1 but it took this intrepid reporter this long to get it posted on the website!

Mark your calendars: Saturday, Nov. 4, 10 a.m. at Laura Sullivan’s house in Maple Valley.  Please send an email to nelson.peter(at)live.com for an address.  It is pretty easy to find, and is an absolutely gorgeous trophy home if you have never been there.

The BIG item on the agenda is next year’s sailing calendar.  That is always a lot of fun to put together.  There will also be some discussion on the future direction of youth sailing in the division, as well as an update on the Hobie 16 North American Championships being organized by Paul Evenden for 2019.  Lots going on.

Stay for the meeting, but come for the party!!  That’s right…right after the meeting we will be going into party mode with a BBQ and potluck.  (So remember to bring something yummy to share.)  I think Laura will have the party accouterments handled.  (Easy for you to say!)

Looking forward to seeing everybody Nov. 4 and swap more sailing lies!!

Div. 4 Championships (Harrison) Recap

For those of you opting not to drive to Harrison Lake Labor Day weekend for the Hobie Div. 4 Championships, you missed a doozy.  Harrison is highly regarded for its dependable medium breeze and flat water.  If you like to trap out and put the bow down, this is the place for you!

And this year did not disappoint!  With 5 double-trap races on Saturday and 4 on Sunday, all of the sailors were all smiles.  But because it wasn’t ‘white knuckle’ sailing, you hit the sandy beach with energy left over!

Saturday started out not looking good.  Smoky skies from the fires and a northerly (wrong direction), along with predictions of ‘stagnant air’ had many of the sailors worried of a long day on the beach.  The AP went up at 1100, but by 1230 it was down, boats were off the beach, and racing was on.

Harrison is a tricky spot tactically.  Sometimes the left pays, sometimes the right, and sometimes the middle.  The left is the traditional, safe bet.  But this weekend it was the middle and right that consistently paid dividends.  There were a few capsizes and pitchpoles to emphasize the puffs coming down.  On particular race Peter Nelson augered in with Todd Morrill, following right after Will’s footsteps with Josh Markovich.  Like son; like father.

The crewing situation was a mixed bag, particularly in the 16 fleet.  When JJ Hoag showed up sick with food poisoning, she turned the reins over to Kailey Jones while JJ’s dad, John, provided tactics and coaching support.  Meanwhile Peter was crewing (sometimes) for Todd, while Laura Sullivan was with Al Jones, and Matt Markovich jumped on Paul Carter’s boat.

On Sunday JJ returned to smiling form.  But Laura was out with a sore back after being thrown into the mast during a capsize on Saturday.  So John and Al jumped on one of Paul’s 18s and proceeded to load their ‘Hobie pistol’ with bullets.

The 18s had a good showing, with far less crew movement, with teams from Kelowna, Seattle, & Vancouver.  The 17 fleet saw a resurgence as well with about 6 boats on the line.  There were even 2 Waves and a 20 that graced the waters.

Paul Evenden’s wife, Debbie, made a delicious dinner for the sailors Saturday night, and it was mowed down by the voracious sailors.  Everyone was in shirt sleeves and it was warm and pleasant evening eating dinner with friends at the beach.  Tough to beat.

Harrison is a fantastic venue if you like flat water, double-trap breeze, tactical waters, beaches, and warm weather.  Thanks, Paul, for organizing it and making it so much fun.

Mini-Mega Recap – “Romancing the Shore”

Aug. 3 – 11 saw Div. 11 putting on a Hobie Mini-Mega event at Sandy Hook Bay Catamaran Club in New Jersey.  This event would crown North American champions in: H-14, H-16 Women, H-16 Youth, Wave, H-17, and H-18.

Div. 4 sent sailors to compete in the H-16 Youth and H-18 events.  The two youth teams included Will Nelson & Josh Markovich along with Jennifer Hoag & Kailey Jones.  “Coach” John Hoag provided beach support and coaching to both teams.  In all 10 youth teams showed up from around the country and old friendships were quickly reacquainted and new ones developed.  The way Hobie youth get along seems so unique compared to other youth groups and continues to impress and instill “The Hobie Way of Life”.

The winds were light-to-medium and the crews were challenged with lumpy water from lots of boat traffic in NY harbor.  Both teams were “hanging around” the top of the fleet.  In the end, the girls got the better of the boys with a strong, 2-3 finish on the last day to finish 4th to the boys’ 5th.

There was a bit of confusion when 3 teams (incl. Will Nelson) were declared ineligible because they turned 21 in the year of the event (rather than after the event).  The 3 teams were allowed to compete with the understanding they could not be crowned champion.  Because the 3rd place team was ineligible, JJ & Kaylie officially finished 3rd in the “youth’ event.  Congrats to both teams!!  They both sailed an incredible series and should be quite proud of their accomplishment.  Kat Porter defended her crown and won the event.

The Hobie 18 champion was easily decided by Ken Marshack, who seemed to have a whole ‘nother gear upwind and downwind.  He had it pretty well locked up by Tuesday.  All week he had straight bullets except for three thirds, the result of 3 OCS’s.

Five of the 8 teams were from Div. 4, thanks especially to the driving of Paul Evenden, who trailered 4 boats, including Doug Westin’s!  Teejay & Angela Fox brought out Gillian Thomson’s boat to round out the team.  While Teejay & Angela were helping out on committee, the other teams were learning how to sail through the slop and chop.  It was quite challenging, but by the end of the week it was clear that all of the teams were much faster.

The Sandy Hook Bay Catamaran Club is a perfect spot.  Sandy beach.  Party tent.  Picnic tables.  Large parking lot and staging area.  Showers.  Support buildings.  The two highlights were the continuous beer keg in the shop with free beer, and the ice cream truck that miraculously appeared several afternoons of the regatta.  To put icing on the proverbial cake, the weather was perfect — warm, sunny (except for 1 day), with wind each of the days, and low humidity.  We got lucky on this one!

Many thanks to our hosts Jim Doty, Greg Raybon, and a cast of dozens of Div. 11 volunteers who made it possible.

NW Area Championships — Skanault??

After an(other) epic weekend at Skamokawa, Div. 4 sailors rallied again at Lake Quinault the following week.  Some went directly from Skamokawa to Quinault, while most others trickled in throughout the week.

Wednesday saw the start of Tim Webb & Kelly Havig’s, 3-day, “Just Add Water” Youth Sailing Camp.  OMG.  How much fun was that to see all these kids having soooo much fun.  It was tough tearing them away from the water.  On more than one evening several of them took off after dinner to get more play time on the Hobies!  Tim & Kelly & crew kept them constantly occupied with games of skill and chance that improved their sailing knowledge and kept them involved.  It didn’t hurt either that the entire week and weekend was full of sun and wind!

By Friday afternoon most of the ‘usual suspects’ had arrived and everyone was into full-time Hobie time.  Lots of mini-parties sprouted and there was a fair amount of catching up as well as the usual boat tinkering.

Saturday and Sunday had consistent 5-15k of wind that challenged all of the crews tactically.  The highlight, though, was Sunday’s first start when everyone but PRO Skip Anderson was in on a little fun.  Seems it was Skip’s birthday, and when his back was turned the plan was laid.

As the final seconds of the Hobie 18 start counted down there was total chaos on the line.  Boats were headed downwind, upwind, off the wind, anywhere but on the start line.  The 16s managed to crowd into the action and as the horn sounded the entire fleet dove into a chorus of “Happy Birthday”.  To say Skip was bewildered and dumbfounded was an understatement.  It was classic Quinault connivery!!

Many lingered on after the weekend for a few more days, not quite ready to give up such beautiful times.  The idea was hoisted that perhaps a little more planning, imagination (and connivery) be invested in that week between Quinault and Skamokawa to make it “Quinault Race Week” or even “Skanault Race Week”!!

Photos courtesy of Jan Anderson.

Todd Christensen Memorial Regatta does not disappoint!

The 2017 running of the Todd Christensen Memorial Regatta was in epic “Todd” conditions.  Sailors enjoyed 15k of breeze both days under sunny skies and a changing tide that saw both flat and bumpy water.  Jeff Janders and committee ran a reaching leg for several of the races that pumped adrenalin into the tired muscles by the end of the day.

But there were a lot of letters on the scoreboard.  No OCS’s, but many DNS and DNF’s as boats were forced to retire.  The most notable was a head on collision between Will Nelson & Josh Markovich and J Rosenbach & Jessie Markovich in the first race that caused both boats to retire for the rest of the day.  That incident sent Josh to the hospital but fortunately it ended up only being “a flesh wound” (if you call a bruised rib flesh).  J’s boat had a big shark bite out of the starboard bow (courtesy graphics by Jessie), while Josh’s front crossbar got a pretty good size ding.  It was that foreceful!

Kelly Havig had her trampoline rip after winning the first race in the 17s and looking good in two more.  Al & Kailey Jones and Dave Wilder – all veteran sailors – uncharacteristically dumped their boats in different races and packed it in.  And Scot Chapman flipped at the start of the last race Sat. in spectacular fashion.

In the 18s Will Schwerger & Angie showed Jeremy & Jeannie Groesz and Jere & Jaedon Bott how it is done with straight bullets except on the last race Saturday.  Then Jeremy got the start of the weekend at the committee boat, fully powered up, at the gun.  Jeremy led wire to wire for the victory.  The rest of the time he and Jere were trading places for 2nd, and it all came down to the double-points distance race on Sunday to see who grab bragging rights.  (Jeremy got it, but not by much.)

After Kelly won the 1st race in the 17s, Lonnie Byers put on a clinic with a string of bullets – allowing Daniel Tarleton to steal a victory in the last race Saturday.  In fact, those two finished 1-2, followed by Dave Wilder who used his string of 2nds on Saturday to overcome three DNFs for third.  It was great to see 6 H-17s as this venue is a perfect fit for that boat.

The 16s were laughing all the way around the course in the first race as Peter and Laura were caught napping on the OR shore.  By the time they realized a race was on Jennifer Hoag was schooling “the old fellas”.  Good going, JJ & John.  Peter & Laura returned in fine form to load a 6-shooter with bullets.  Paul Carter & Tim Player put together a string of 2nds, except when they let Tim Webb & Jennifer Olegario slip by in the second race, and Rich Arneson & John Hilton in the 3rd race.   Rich & John were consistent all weekend to wrap up 3rd by taking advantage of a couple of DNFs for JJ & John.  Of the 8 16s, only 3 sailed all of the races – Paul, Tim, and Rich.

Saturday night Della, Carlissa and team opened up Della’s Diner for some delicious, homemade tacos & burritos (and homemade cookies) for the voracious sailors.  Action Repair Services (Jeremy Groesz) and Full Service Property Management (Peter Nelson) teamed up, with Jeremy providing a keg of beer and Peter soft drinks and water.  Chatter of the day’s stories filled the air.

After the kids arrived back from Cathlamet with ice cream Peter held a live auction.  Donations from: West Coast Sailing, Hobie Cats NW, Fisheries Supply, Tim Webb, Laura Sullivan – together with registration fees and contributions from John S. Hoag, DDS – swelled the net proceeds to over $1,500.  These funds will be donated to Hobie youth sailing.  In fact, a 3-day youth sailing camp is/was being held up the road at Lake Quinault just 3 days after this event – all courtesy of our fine supporters and contributors.  Please be sure to acknowledge our sponsors with business – and tell them Todd Christensen sent you!

Sunday’s long distance was looong — three hours long!  It was mostly double trap upwind except when it lightened at the turn mark.  Everything was pretty reasonable downwind till you got to Skamokawa.  Then the wind picked up another 5-10k and it was game on.  Committee set a downwind mark and then instead of going into the beach we beat up to a turn mark and then what was supposed to be a broad reach to the beach.

But the wind between those 2 last marks was puffy — like 10-15k difference puffy!   One second you are traveled out in a 20k puff and the next moment you are sitting in 5k or less.  It was crazy!  A couple of boats (who shall remain nameless) augured in at the turning mark in the big breeze.  In the end, after 170 long minutes ‘in the saddle’, the difference between 1st and 2nd was 2 seconds!!

Peter and Laura stole the win from Paul & Tim, who were one good shoulder away from winning the race overall.  Paul had just had surgery on his shoulder and was told by the doctors “Don’t sail in anything more than 5k.”  Sure.  No problem.  I am only going to Skamokawa.  What could go wrong?!    

At the awards there were laughs and smiles and more stories to tell on shore about which side paid or didn’t pay.  But what really puts the cherry on top of the cake are Dean and Lucy.  They drive down from Seattle to Skamokawa every year to present the perpetual trophy with their son’s name on it to the overall winner of the long distance race.  The trophy was built by Dean and John about 3 years ago..

Todd’s name is enshrined as the first winner because he was defending champion of the long distance race when he passed away.  Then a youth sailor, John Ped, won it the following year — further cementing Todd’s legacy as a champion of youth sailing.  Last year Todd’s best friend, John Hoag, won it.  This year the organizer of Todd’s race, Peter, won it.  So somewhere up there we are sure Todd is all smiles!!  God bless you, Todd!

P.S. Andrew Richardson came down Sunday and got some great drone footage.  Here is the link if you want to see the finishes!  https://youtu.be/OqxCWuuSDXc